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Beho Beho was the first camp to be sited in The Selous Game Reserve, not on the banks, or the flood plains of the mighty Rufiji River, but in the cooler highlands so as to enjoy the ‘cooling breezes’ from which its name derives. Always designated as a ‘private camp’ it has fiercely protected its individuality and privileged location as one of the most ‘magical’ places it is possible to visit in safari Africa.

Owned by the Bailey family for over forty years, they are now prepared to share their ‘home in the bush’ with a fortunate few who are able to share their enjoyment of Beho Beho, one of their favourite places in the world.

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Your Banda

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Banda is an East African term for a permanent ‘solid structure’ erected to give protection from the elements and the animals, as opposed to the impermanence of a tent. 

The bandas at Beho Beho are also a comfortable haven from which to enjoy the delights of the true African bush of the Selous Game Reserve.

The feeling of spaciousness is accentuated by the fact that the main suite area has no front wall or windows, but is totally open on to the front verandah of each banda. For those a little nervous of sleeping with just a mosquito net between them and the ‘great outdoors’ there is an ingenious arrangement of a curtain made out of tenting material, complete with gauze windows, which can be drawn across at night and securely fastened. The verandah itself reveals what must be one of the most magnificent views in Africa – a wild, unspoilt, wilderness stretching out to the far horizon liberally sprinkled with a wide variety of ‘big game’!

A separate dressing room with ample space to unpack and store clothes and belongings, including a personal combination security safe, leads into a spacious fully equipped bathroom with twin wash hand basins, a high flush W.C. and a spacious open-air shower where it is possible to shower and view big game at the same time. The bathrooms are supplied with Charlotte Rhys toiletries, shower gel, shampoo, conditioner, body lotion, and soaps as well as a hair drier and his and hers bathrobes and slippers.

For the 2019-20 season plunge pools and individual sun bathing decks were constructed alongside each banda allowing guests to sunbathe privately and enjoy a cooling dip whilst enjoying uninterrupted game viewing.

Bailey’s Banda

Bailey’s Banda
Privacy and Exclusivity – Bailey’s Banda, an ‘owner’s house’ or private villa positioned on the hillside overlooking the main camp enjoys stunning views into the valley and the hippo pools which are certainly wild Africa at its very best. Bailey’s Banda is still part of the camp but enjoys its privacy and is the perfect hideaway for those who want to appreciate the bush without the ‘camaraderie’ of staying in a ‘house party-style’ camp like Beho Beho.

Your home in Africa – Staying in Bailey’s Banda is very much like having your own house in Africa, a luxurious haven for exploring the magnificent Selous game reserve, but on your own terms – whether it is on foot, in your exclusive safari vehicle or your exclusive private boat on nearby Lake Tagalala. During the heat of the day what better than to have your own private pool, sun deck or the shade of a sun-umbrella and in the evenings dinner under the stars before settling down in the comfort of your own sitting room to enjoy some music or a movie before bed.

Just for you – With two very spacious Beho Beho style en suite bedrooms – one of them raised up on first floor level – one with a king-sized bed and one twin bedded room, Bailey’s Banda is ideal for honeymooners, friends travelling together, or families (but still not really suitable for children under twelve years ). The open-plan and open-sided main areas of the banda have many combinations of dining and relaxing spaces, together with a plunge pool and sunbathing/game viewing deck. The accent is on privacy and enjoying the quality ‘private time’ that is sometimes hard to find on safari, with dedicated staff, its own kitchen (complete with chef) and exclusive safari vehicle. Game activities are tailor-made to suit each guest and are guided and guarded by some of the most qualified guides in East Africa.

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Safaris

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Beho Beho, originally a hunting camp, was the first property to be sited in the reserve. It was placed at the very centre of wildlife activity and diversity, in the cooler hillside location near to a permanent water source providing a ‘magnet’ for thirsty animals. The hunters of times gone by obviously knew a thing or two about siting camps! Successive camps north of the Rufiji River were sited along the banks of the river giving close proximity to the many resident hippo and crocodiles.

From Beho Beho it is possible to explore a unique array of environmental biodiversity, from the riverine forests, miombo woodlands and plains to the fascinating lake regions of Tagalala and Mwanze. The speciality of the camp is to go on guided and guarded walking safaris, either early mornings or late afternoons avoiding the intense heat of the day when both animals and humans tend to look for suitable shade. The morning walks commence at 0630hrs and last from three to five hours including a stop for breakfast at a shady spot. Afternoon walks can also be very rewarding, leaving at 1630 hrs for about two hours to meet a vehicle well supplied with welcome ‘sundowner’ drinks, before the darkness comes and it is time to drive back to camp. Beho Beho is one of the few safari camps where it is possible to walk straight from the camp itself, with a variety of routes to hippo pools, First World War trenches, the grave of Frederick Courtney Selous, for who the reserve was named, and several easy or more demanding trails known only to our walking guides.

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